Cars: Pre-election bubble the transition to electrification

In a country that is still in financial turmoil, it is impossible to have citizens who can spend at least 40,000 euros to buy a car in the … socket.

Image result for natural gas car

Pre-election tricks and fireworks for internal consumption characterize car market makers as the government’s announcements for the gradual elimination of diesel cars and the transition to electrification. Mr. Stathakis even spoke of making proposals for the next ten years for a ten-year plan that would essentially “hold the car” in the car. oil (and gradually also gasoline) and will lead citizens to acquire electric cars. And if, as announcements, they move in the right direction, what does not say to the responsible is how to achieve such a plan – mammoth.

Besides, in a country that is still in financial turmoil, it is impossible to have citizens who can spend at least 40,000 euros to buy a car in … a socket.

According to the data, only 397 electric vehicles were circulating in Greece in 2016, with special mention being made of the age of vehicles, with four in ten being over 17, a figure that is 30% in public cars. Commercial vehicle fleets, such as taxis, are allowed to move to the age of 21, or even Euro 2 (1996-2000).
At the same time, according to Star, heavier trucks and buses are allowed to circulate in the big ring, even if they are 20+ years old, making it imperative to reform the rules of the green ring.

Since 2011, diesel cars have been launched in Athens and Thessaloniki with modern anti-pollution technologies Euro 5 and 6, ie cars up to 8 years of age. Incomplete policing has led to another burden on the environment. Based on estimates from the Commission, over 400,000 people die prematurely every year in the EU due to microparticle air pollution, of which more than 11,000 are in Greece.

What incentives could be given to replace the fleet of private cars? How many of the hundreds of thousands of unemployed and semi-employed people could replace the “sandwiches” they can not even maintain? And how many would buy a new car when they did not have to pay any insurance and circulation fees?

It is worth noting that 86% of the fleet is driven by some kind of petrol (unleaded), while with 13.3% oil.

Especially on buses, petroleum is the main fuel (95%), while with alternative fuels, ie liquefied petroleum gas and natural gas, it is only 1.8% of the total. Natural gas currently consumes only 310 buses in Athens.